Richard S. Vosko

Musings on religion, art and architecture


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Homily – 25 June 2017 – Fear Nothing


Twelfth Sunday in Ordinary Time A – 25 June 2017 – Fear Nothing

Click Here for Today’s Biblical Texts

When he was elected president in the midst of the Great Depression Franklin D. Roosevelt encouraged the American people to regain faith in themselves. The depression took a toll on this country – taxes were rising, industries were unproductive, foreign trade was almost non-existent, farmers had no markets and the savings of many families were erased.

In his inaugural address, FDR outlined in broad terms a perspective he would bring to his leadership. He reminded Americans that the nation’s common difficulties concerned only material things and, that “the only thing we have to fear is fear itself.”

Not all people in this country today have the same fears that some of our forebears had in the 1930s. But different kinds of anxieties can create a collective panic attack. Journalist Edward Luce lists these symptoms — a growing opioid epidemic, the decline in life expectancy, increasing intolerance for other people’s points of view, and a fading enthusiasm to join social groups.  [1]

If you are in prison today you fear the inmates and guards. If you are homeless you are scared of other people on the street. If you are without food you worry about your health. If you are a gay or lesbian or transgendered person you fear prejudice. Whatever your color you are afraid of the consequences. If you are traveling you worry about terrorism.

How does God figure into these concerns? In the first reading Jeremiah delivers bad news to the Israelites. The city of Jerusalem would be captured; Jews would be arrested and detained in a humiliating encampment. Although he described God as one who would protect people from oppression Jeremiah himself was persecuted and jailed for “denouncing” the ruthless king Nebuchadnezzar. (DeBona 193-94) 

In the gospel Jesus sent his followers on a mission and, as he often did before, he predicted that they would face difficulties, that their message would be rejected. Many early Christians were persecuted, jailed, murdered for sticking to the moral principles and lifestyles Jesus modeled for them. Nevertheless, Jesus told them to “fear nothing.”

Pope Francis added his thoughts in a recent TED talk. He warned the world’s powerful leaders to be more humble or face ruin. He called on all of us to join him in a “revolution of tenderness” to “react against evil” by putting ourselves “at the level of the other,” to listen and to care.

We do not face the same problems that existed in this nation after the Depression. But whenever we are afraid to speak up for justice or to practice a Christian way of living we contribute to the problems. Sometimes we let the opinions of others, true or not, prevent us from doing what we know to be right. Sometimes, by ignoring the problems or pretending they do not exist, we perpetuate them. 

President Roosevelt died in 1945 while in the fourth term of his presidency. In 1960, his wife Eleanor Roosevelt published a book called You Learn by Living. In the chapter titled “Fear – the Great Enemy” she wrote, ”The danger lies in refusing to face the fear, in not daring to come to grips with it … You must do the thing you think you cannot do.”  [2]

Our belief in God’s unconditional and tender love for us gives us strength and confidence to advance the kingdom of God against all odds. However, belief will not by itself accomplish peace and justice in our communities unless we take action. In that 1933 inaugural address FDR also said “this nation asks for action and action now.”

Many of us agree but do not know exactly what to do.  Today as we eat bread and drink from the cup, as we claim again that we are the body of Christ, let’s imagine our lives not marked by fear, but rather by bold determination and solidarity.


  1.  Luce, Edward. The Retreat of Western Liberalism. (NY: Atlantic Monthly Press) 2017, 38
  2.  Ralph Waldo Emerson wrote in his 1841 essay Heroism, “Always do what you are afraid to do.”


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Homily – Trinity Sunday – 11 June 2017 – Reimagining a Mystery


Trinity Sunday A – June 11, 2017 – Reimagining a Mystery

Click here for today’s biblical texts

Apple just released a new device called HomePod. It is designed to compete with other companies in the field of emerging technologies like artificial intelligence, virtual and augmented reality. Farhad Manjoo wrote, “Apple seems to be transforming itself into a new kind of company, one that prioritizes the nerdy technical stuff that will become the foundation of tomorrow’s intelligent machines.”

Many mainstream religions also are experiencing transformations while others avoid making any significant changes. Our church, just like Apple, eager to serve its customers in order to stay in business, also needs to reinvent itself from time to time. Theologian Fr. Joseph Martos wrote, otherwise Catholicism is destined to become a church of beautiful ceremonies that have little to do with the real lives of people. [1]

In this light, how do we grasp one of the doctrinal anchors of Christianity, the Trinity? It cannot be ignored or dissolved but it does need to be reinvented or re-imagined in order to make sense in this age. The doctrine is not explicit in scripture and took close to 350 years to develop in theological circles. So too, to grasp what it means to say we believe in a triune Godhead today requires continued investigation.  

Jesuit Roger Haight writes that although God is a mystery the doctrine of the Trinity, should not be beyond our comprehension. Haight continued, it is the story of human salvation as the Christian community has encountered it.  [2] For us then it is a very real story of the creative action of God; the failure of humans to care for one another and creation; the liberating mission of Jesus of Nazareth, God’s chosen one; and, the spirit of that mission entrusted to us as a powerful force in our lives.

Today’s gospel helps us focus on one part of the story. The passage this morning follows Jesus’ conversation with a Pharisee, Nicodemus, about what it means to be born again of water and the spirit. The reading calls our attention to the action of God in our lives, revealed in three persons: “God the Father, Jesus the Son, and the Holy Spirit.” How this Godly action is manifested today depends on our response to it. 

We strive to love the beauty of creation without trying to control it. We yearn to repair the world and to rejoice in the wonders of God’s continual creativity. We strive to make the teachings of Jesus of Nazareth tangible by our deeds and to pass those teachings on to others. We look for ways to give thanks for our liberty and to embrace our responsibility to redeem others. Our calling is to create a kingdom of  God on earth, a beautiful, peaceful world filled with dignity, truth and justice. [3]

These three actions — creation, redemption and revelation — comprise the narrative shared by all of us. They recognize that the work of God continues in our lives today. They remind us of the healing power of reconciliation. They give us hope for tomorrow.

There is really nothing mysterious about the doctrine of the Trinity unless we choose to keep it a secret. Karl Rahner was keen on saying the Trinity resides in us. Built on centuries of human narratives, the teachings about the triune God continue to pave a path for us. Although our journeys are not the same, they are guided by the same holy spirit. 

Apple did not invent the computer, the smart phone or any other popular device. It is a successful company because of its willingness to reinvent technologies in order to be relevant in the marketplace. Religions like ours need to do the same. 

Our belief in a triune God is not to be underestimated or disregarded. However, our convictions need to be lived out in ways that are constantly being reimagined in order to be effective in a modern world.

__________

  1.  Martos, Joseph. Deconstructing Sacramental Theology and Reconstructing Catholic Ritual (Eugene OR: Resource Publications) 2015, 298
  2.  Haight, Roger. “What is the Trinity?” A lecture at Carrs Lane United Reformed Church, Birmingham, UK, October 27, 2011
  3.  Paraphrased from Turning Life Into a Prayer. Central Synagogue, New York, NY 2014

 


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Homily Pentecost – June 4, 2017 – It’s Getting Warm in Here!


Pentecost A June 4, 2017 – It’s Getting Warm in Here

Click here for today’s biblical texts

A recent issue of Sports Illustrated published a story on Jeffrey Glasbrenner who lost his leg as a young boy while working on the family farm. In the hospital, another boy, in the adjacent bed, was dying of cancer. His mother said to Jeffrey’s mother, You can “raise him to be independent, or raise him to need everyone around him for the rest of his life.” [1]

Traditionally, on the feast of Pentecost, we analyze the meanings behind the graphic images of hurricane force winds and descending tongues of fire. We imagine a group of people with overlapping questions. What’s next? How do we do it? Would their mission, to establish unity among God’s people, be an independent campaign or a movement that would depend on a partnership with others?

Let’s first look at the imagery. The driving wind described in the reading from Luke/Acts echoes God’s presence in several Hebrew scriptures — the radiant sunshine that would come after raging storms. There is the warmth of hope and a new creation emerging from frightening times.

The reference to fiery tongues suggests, in a modern day context, that we have moved away from the scattered, independent communities, described in the text as a cacophony of diverse voices, toward unification by the Spirit. [2] No one person, no one religion, no one country can survive alone on this fragile planet. Solidarity and interconnectivity fill us with blessings, gladness and new life the Spirit.

Although in John’s gospel the reception of the Spirit occurs on the day Jesus was raised from the dead, it is celebrated, as we do, fifty days after the resurrection. Pentecost is a word Christians borrowed from Greek speaking Jews and occurs at the same time our Jewish friends celebrate their second greatest feast, Shavuot, a commemoration of the giving of the law on Mt. Sinai. This year these two feasts occur during Ramadan the month of fasting and prayer on the Muslim calendar.

As a trinity of religions, linked by common ancestors, we are distinct but not separate in our peace seeking efforts. Our task is to foster unity and love among all people, and even among nations. As Christians we give primary attention to what human beings have in common and what promotes unity among us. [3]

President Trump’s recent decision to withdraw our country from the Paris climate agreement presents another viewpoint on how people might work together. Two of the president’s top advisors wrote in the Wall Street Journal that the president has “a clear-eyed outlook that the world is not a ‘global community’ but an arena where nations, nongovernmental actors and businesses engage and compete for advantage.” [4]

This executive decision is of concern for Christians and others because it contradicts the story and the spirit of Pentecost that extol working together to solve problems, to move forward, to make progress. The Spirit in that upper room did not suggest that the mission of Jesus should be kept a secret or, that it was to serve only a select few.

Ironically, tomorrow, June 5th, is World Environment Day, a United Nations initiative to raise awareness around climate justice. It could be a day when, as a Christian church birthed in the spirit of Easter and Pentecost, we recommit ourselves to the reduction of our own carbon footprints.

We can undertake the mission of Jesus alone or with the help of everyone around us. Jeffrey Glasbrenner, the subject of that sports story, grew up to become a world class athlete and the first American amputee to scale Mt. Everest. He did not do it alone.

____________________

1 Murphy, Austin. “Peak Performer” in Sports Illustrated May 8, 2017, 27

2 DeBona, Guerric. Between the Ambo and the Altar: Biblical Preaching and the Roman Missal Year A. (Collegeville: Liturgical Press) 2013, 147-48

3 The Vatican Two Ecumenical Council, “Declaration on the Relationship of the Church to Non-Christian Religions” (October 28, 1965) No. 1

4 McMaster, HR & Cohn, G. “America First Doesn’t Mean America Alone” in the Wall Street Journal. May 30, 2017


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Homily – 28 May 2017 – In Between No More and Not Yet


EASTER 7A – 28 May 2017 – In Between No More and Not Yet

Click here for today’s biblical texts

Last Thursday the church celebrated the ascension of Christ into heaven. However, today, the seventh Sunday of Easter, we just heard a segment of the priestly prayer said by Jesus before his death, resurrection and ascension.

This quirk in our liturgical calendar prompts us to remember the departure of Christ from planet earth. At the same time we anticipate the celebration of the presence of the Spirit in the world Jesus left behind. In other words, you and I are in between no more and not yet.

The world was a dangerous place during the time of Jesus. Although he coached his disciples, teaching them everything he learned from his parents and his God, he worried that they would not be able to carry on without him. Would they give up in the face of life’s challenges? So Jesus prayed for them: “I do not pray for the world but for the ones you have given me.” He asked that God would keep them united; that they would be loyal to his teachings and that they would grow in holiness.  [1]

Jesus’ commission was not only to the disciples but to all those, through the ages, who would come to know and believe in his teachings. The continuation and hopeful completion of his works of mercy, blessings and goodness, involve all of us. How does Jesus’ prayer relate to us? How do we handle life’s pressures?

Our social climate is tenuous. Denis Johnson, a poet and novelist who wrote about people living on the fringes of society, died last week. One obituary said Johnson’s “America, past or present, is a troubled land, staggering from wretched excess and aching losses, a country where dreams have often slipped into out-and-out delusions and, people hunger for deliverance, if only in the person of a half-baked messiah.”

In a season when we would think that Christ’s resurrection, our graduations, baptisms, first communions and weddings would make us leap with joy, we cannot forget where we are in history. Nor can we overlook the significance of Jesus’ farewell prayer that calls us to holiness, unity and mission.

In this parish we frequently focus on our baptismal calling to work for justice. As a part of that vocation prayer is critical. In the passage from Luke-Acts we read that the disciples devoted their lives to prayer. We too are called to be united in our efforts, strong in prayer and faithful to doing good works.”  [2]

Psychologist Martin Seligman and journalist John Tierney write that human beings are not built to live in the moment but to contemplate the future. It is our foresight that created civilization and sustains society. While some research has suggested we are imprisoned by the past and the present, looking to the future is what makes us wise. Those studies suggest a purpose of the brain is to continually rewrite history. 

Our lives are constantly moving in between no more and not yet. What does this timeframe invite us to consider? We remember the past for moorings but we do not dwell there. We wrestle with the present to survive but we do not stay here. We look to the future to imagine possibilities where we find unending hope. As we prepare for Pentecost we contemplate how the Holy Spirit of Justice moves among us, stirring up in us lives of prayer and action. We may be in between no more and not yet but as spiritual visionaries, we are not afraid of tomorrow.

___________

  1. Perkins, Pheme. In the New Jerome Biblical Commentary, (Englewood Cliffs, N.J.: Prentice-Hall)1990, 978
  2.  Martens, John W. The Word on the Street. Year A (Collegevile: Liturgical Press) 2016, 53-54


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Homily – 14 May 2017 – Things of Heaven & Earth


Fifth Sunday of Easter A  – May 14, 2017 – Things of Heaven and Earth

Click here for today’s biblical texts

Fatima 051317

Thousands of pilgrims at Fátima this weekend!

This weekend Pope Francis is visiting Fátima, Portugal’s most renowned pilgrimage site. The pope will canonize Jacinta and Francisco Marto, two of the children who saw visions of Mary, the Mother of Jesus, 100 years ago.

Apparitions of Mary like the one at Fátima and others in Mexico, Ireland, France and Belgium, challenge the limitations of human thought. Consider what Hamlet said to Horatio after seeing a ghost: “there are more things in heaven and earth, Horatio, than are dreamt of in your (our) philosophy.” Hamlet (1.5.167-8)

Each Easter season our scriptures give us some idea of what may have happened to the followers of Christ after his post-resurrection appearances. They are stories of fear, disagreements, excitement, hope, skepticism and belief.

What is most curious is that, although Mary the Mother of Jesus is so highly regarded today as a model for facing problems of adversity and healing and even political strife, the bible does not tell us much about her presence or her contributions to these emerging communities after the resurrection of Christ.

What we do know about Mary is that she knew Jesus better than anyone else and after his death she had to confront loss, misunderstanding, isolation. You would think that early church leaders eagerly would have turned to her for her wisdom about what she had learned as the mother of Jesus and what he would do and say in various circumstances.

Spreading the gospel in the first century was not easy. Tensions existed because missionaries like Peter, Paul, Barnabas and others were evangelizing in places where there were diverse cultures. Just as in any community today the questions had to do with leadership, community power, political resistance, jealousy, fear and handling emergencies. Today’s first reading tells us the community was concerned about who would tend to hungry persons and those with few resources especially some widows?

To address this concern for people who were hungry the author of Luke-Acts wrote that seven reputable men were chosen to serve, a choice that was not arbitrary but acceptable to that community. Guerric DeBona, an expert in biblical and cultural studies, wrote that “consensus occurs when the community is gathered for consultation,” and that the “good order of the community allows for the word of God to move among the people.” [1]

Similar realities and diversities are present in our church today. As memberships in mainline religions continue to dwindle in some regions, the question for you and me is: how do we experience and sustain a modern day faith community? Our house has cracks in it that need attention otherwise the structure will collapse. 

Fixing the fissures, keeping the family together, requires teamwork, sharing the blame, telling the truth, seeking consensus and listening to different voices. Sometimes we will discover that clinging to the status quo is no longer sufficient and that new spiritual awakenings are important.

The second reading from Peter offers a blueprint for renewal and restoration. We are the living stones, the ministers chosen by God to be built into a spiritual house where we and others can find purpose, refuge and strength. [This is the kind of home where our children who share in holy communion with us for the first time today will find new life and nourishment.]

Jesus also used architecture to make a point. In his farewell address to his friends in that “Upper Room” he urged them not to be troubled. He said he was going home, to a very big house, and he would reserve a room for anyone willing to live justly and walk humbly. God’s house is so big there is room for everyone. No one is turned away.

Like a mother comforting her children Jesus’ words were reassuring to his followers. Our Lady of Fatima offered similar consolation in 1917 when she promised that prayer and good works would help end World War I. Her message still has merit today. At a candle light vigil Friday night in Fátima, the pope urged the pilgrims to “tear down all walls and cross every frontier … to make known God’s justice and peace.” This is something we can do together.


DeBona, Guerric. Between the Ambo and the Altar: Biblical Preaching and the Roman Missal Year A. (Collegeville: Liturgical Press) 2013, 130


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Homily 7 May 2017 “Open Wide the Gates!”


Fourth Sunday of Easter  – May 7, 2017 – Open Wide the Gates!

Click here for today’s biblical texts

A classmate of mine in the seminary has a son who is a border patrol officer in Arizona. His job is to keep Mexicans and other Latin Americans from crossing illegally into the United States. Fair enough. 

Human rights groups, however, are concerned about the way border crossers are detained while waiting for their cases to be reviewed. Other sources tell us that, since October 2000, more people have perished trying to enter this country than have died in the September 11 attacks and in Hurricane Katrina combined.

The biblical texts for today are familiar. They are about gateways, gardens, and gatekeepers. We’ve heard the comforting words of the psalmist often, in different contexts — God is a shepherd who protects us and provides verdant pastures and restful waters and, we have need of nothing else. But this promise cannot be true. There is plenty we want.

Consider the children, men and women in refugee camps worldwide trying to cross borders into more secure and fertile pastures. Hundreds of thousands are stuck in Uganda, South Sudan, Tanzania, Jordan. These are not temporary settlements. The gates in these camps do not swing both ways. Too far away for you and me to be concerned?

As many of you know the fastest growing immigration detention system in the world is right here in the United States. It holds illegal immigrants caught trying to enter this country; asylum seekers escaping brutal regimes; anyone with or without a criminal record. Sometimes legal, permanent residents are detained on the suspicion of being here illegally. 

How would we talk with those confined in these camps and centers? How would we explain an absentee shepherd? The passage from Peter reminds us that the death of Jesus, the good shepherd, liberated all of us. But that theological aphorism does not seem to apply to everyone. How do we understand this promise in light of present global realities?

What locks the gates of opportunity for ourselves and others? Could it be power mongers who govern nation states? Could it be that the privatization of detention centers is a big business? Maybe what blocks us are our own cultural mindsets, our personal political leanings, our subjective fears of the stranger or ancient theological assumptions about who gets saved. Who gets into the sheepfold? Who is left out?

The gospel of John insists that the only way to have life more abundantly is to repent, get baptized and follow Jesus into the safety of the sheepfold. And then, what?  What happens after repentance and baptism? Tithing? Ministry? Charitable works? Is that it? How does the care of the divine shepherd reach oppressed people or those who have been shunned by their church? Where is the shepherd leading you and me?

Lutheran theologian Anna Carter Florence wonders if, unwittingly, the church itself is a boundary between the saved and the not- saved. She suggests that the sheep gate we heard about today merely marks the boundary between where we are in our lives and what we are to do next.  [1]

If Jesus is our liberator; if his life’s work is a model for us; if his cross is a symbol of injustice; if you and I are called to tackle the sinfulness symbolized by that cross then … you and I are bound by our baptism to open the gates that lead to pastures where all people can find food, shelter and the opportunity to grow in freedom.

Samuel Moyn, a religion and ethics writer for ABC, reminds us, historically societies world wide cultivated robust theories of governmental obligations toward individual rights, but also of individuals toward one another.” However, the problem today is that my right to be free from oppression does not always translate into my duty, my obligation to eradicate injustices so that others would not have to suffer.

Our religion and our nation are both founded on making it possible for all to live in freedom and without fear. We, as human beings, are called to be gatekeepers of heaven and earth; to open wide the doors of opportunity for ourselves, for others close to us and for all people on this earth. 

1. Florence, Anna Carter. Working Preacher Year A.  (St. Paul, MN: Luther Seminary 2016) 62


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Easter Sunday Homily – 16 April 2017


Easter Sunday A – 16 April 2017 

Scroll down to read the homily for the April 15th Easter Vigil 

Click here for the Easter Sunday biblical texts

Henry Osawa Tanner_s “The Three Marys” (1910)

“The Three Mary’s” Henry Osawa Tanner 1910

Years ago some friends and I had the opportunity to march briefly with the Mothers of Plaza de Mayo in Buenos Aires, Argentina. The women were protesting the disappearance of their husbands and children. Like Jesus of Nazareth many of those men were kidnapped, punished and executed for not aligning themselves with a government that denied people basic human rights. Fearful of retribution from the police, those mothers found strength in each other.

Today’s familiar gospel tells of another woman — Mary of Magdala. Unafraid of the Roman guards, she went to the cemetery to pay her respect at the tomb of Jesus. When she found the stone removed she ran to tell the other disciples who were in hiding and feeling guilty for abandoning Jesus. Along the way she met up with Jesus raised from the dead.

To learn what happened when Mary reached the disciples we turn to the less familiar Gospel of Mary of Magdala, written about the same time as the Gospel of Luke. According to that text Mary met the disciples and found them weeping and grieving. She comforted them with hugs and kisses and then told them what Jesus said to her.

She said Jesus did not dwell at all on his passion and death for the forgiveness of our sins. Rather, he said that the focus of his teachings is on the goodness of humanity. This comes as wonderful news for people who have been told they are hopeless and shameful as humans.  [1]

The disciples were taken back by her words and began doubting her credibility. Andrew was upset that Jesus spoke such words to a woman. Peter wondered why would Jesus say something to her and not to them. They began to argue among themselves missing the point of what Mary was trying to say to them.  [2]

In the face of rejection and humiliation and with the support of the disciple Levi, Mary of Magdala emerges as a strong, confident, loyal disciple of Christ. According to Karen King, the Gospel presents the most convincing argument for the legitimacy of women’s leadership. 

In reading this gospel of Mary of Magdala, I think of those marching mothers in Argentina, the families crying for the return of their daughters in Nigeria, and, all those who lead marches in this country protesting unstable governments and corrupt legal systems. 

Easter is not only about the one time raising of Jesus of Nazareth from death. By linking the human and divine in Christ, we discover that that mystery cannot be separated from his life time achievements or from whatever may happen in our future.  [3]

For you and me the resurrection points to our own evolving transformations and our deepest hopes. Seeking reconciliation, justice and peace is the undertaking of any group willing to identify with the ethical ideals taught by Jesus.

The second reading suggests we do this first by tossing out the old yeast that gives rise to greed, power and injustice. Then we become a fresh batch of dough desperately “kneaded” into nourishment for people who hunger for a chance to advance their lives in a troubled and increasingly unstable world. The sense of belonging to a larger source of energy is a good reason for belonging to a community like this one.

God continues to act in history. Today and throughout the Easter season, we affirm our place in God’s creative process. This God is not beyond our human experiences, out there somewhere. No. It is a good God who loves the human race and continues to walk with us right now.

__________

  1.  Tausig, Hal. A New Testament: A Bible for the 21st Century Combining Traditional and Newly Discovered Texts. (NY: Houghton,Mifflin Harcourt 2013, 217
  2.  King, Karen L. The Gospel of Mary of Magdala: Jesus and the First Woman Apostle.  Santa Rosa: Polebridge Press, 2003)
  3.  Richard Rohr, Eager to Love: The Alternative Way of Francis of Assisi (Franciscan Media: 2014, 219-220)