Richard S. Vosko

Musings on religion, art and architecture


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MY EXTENDED SABBATICAL


Dear Friends, Parishioners, Readers of my blog:

As many of you now know I am taking an extended sabbatical to complete a number of writing projects concerning Post-Conciliar church architecture. My research will build on the work I have been doing for the past 45 years. Of course, the award winning St. Vincent de Paul church, Albany, NY will be featured.

Although the entire schedule is hard to determine right now, it is important for me to take sufficient time to complete the tasks ahead. In this light, I will not be posting a homily on this blog until further notice.

Know of my sincere appreciation for the helpful comments and suggestions you have given me since I began this blog in February 2010. You have helped my preaching immensely. Thank you.

Peace be with you.

RSV


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Homily 9 July 2017 – Lighten Everyone’s Load


14th Sunday in Ordinary Time A – 9 July 2017 – Lighten Everyone’s Load

Click here for today’s biblical texts

Earlier this week I visited the Shaker Museum in New Lebanon to see a very small exhibit called “Break Every Yoke: Shakers, Gender Equality and Women’s Suffrage.” Given the gospel for today I was intrigued by what the Shakers meant by sharing the yoke. The members (two remain) hold that God is both male and female. They have always been cognizant of the impact that that belief has on the roles women played in spiritual and secular societies. 

I read part of an 1865 speech called “The Renovated Woman” by Antoinette Doolittle. She called for women to release themselves from the yoke around their necks. Here is what she wrote about women seventeen years after the First Woman’s Rights Convention held in Seneca Falls, NY.

“Now we hear a trumpet voice sounding loud and clear calling her to come forth from the tomb wherein her best powers and capabilities have been buried and lain dormant for so long.” [1]

The gospel we just heard celebrates a knowledge of God that comes to us from Jesus Christ himself. This intelligence is rooted in Jesus’ understanding of his relationship with God. We can share in that relationship by responding to his comforting invitation, “come to me, the yoke is easy, the burden is light.” What makes subjugation, bondage, light for women and men today? Who can ease our worries and troubles? 

Jesus’ words echo the passage from Sirach 51:26 “take her yoke upon your neck; that your mind may receive her teaching. For she is close to those who seek her, and the one who is in earnest finds her.” Scholars tell us Jesus is the incarnate voice of the wisdom of God. In this Old Testament passage wisdom is depicted with female pronouns.

We are thankful for whatever blessings we have in our lives. We also realize there are things that can weigh us down. Working our way through life we grow in our appreciation of the liberties we have in this nation, the support of close friends, our family members and the sustenance found in our faith based communities. Each of these relationships helps us overcome our fears by lightening our yokes and easing our burdens.

The word “yoke” can mean different things. It can be a heavy device placed on the neck of a defeated person. It can be a wooden frame placed over the shoulders of strong animals working together in the fields. A yoke can be a bad thing or, it can be a good thing. 

These scriptures help me realize how women and men, working together, pick us up, nourish us, encourage us. But, what will it take to free each other from all forms of oppression? How do we help release the gifts and talents we possess?

The poet and activist, Audre Lorde wrote directly to women, about the passion women feel in their bodies. In her words, “As we begin to recognize our deepest feelings, we begin to give up, of necessity, being satisfied with suffering and self-negation, and with the numbness which so often seems like our only alternative in our society. Our acts against oppression become integral with self, motivated and empowered from within.” [2]

As I read her essay I have a better appreciation for whatever cohorts of faith do to free people up so they can realize their full potential as children of God. We often speak about those who are hungry (like the 10,000 individuals served by our pantry so far this year), homeless people, or those oppressed because of race, religion, nationality or sexual orientation.

Today’s biblical texts speak to us, using the comforting words of God’s wisdom, to help us see where there are yokes around our necks. When we share each other’s burdens we can ease our pain if not entirely set us free.

Jesus called us to live in a kingdom where there is peace, where the yoke is easy and the burden is diminished. This is our vocation as Christians — to lighten the load for everyone.

_______

 1. Antoinette Doolittle, “Renovated Woman” in Shakers and Shakeress, No 5. January 1875.

2. Lorde, Audre. Sister Outsider: Essays and Speeches by Audre Lorde. (Freedom, CA: The Crossing Press, 1984) 58


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Homily – 2 July 2017 – Keeping Our Households Together


Ordinary Time 13 A – 2 July 2017 – Keeping Our Households Together

Click here for today’s biblical texts

This time of the year can be wonderful for many families — reunions, graduations, first communions, weddings, the 4th of July holiday. But at the same time family gatherings can also be disheartening when disagreements turn to resentment and even separation. 

On a broader scale, the same thing happens in religion and politics. For example, in our church and our nation we have discord over cultural and humanitarian issues. How do we keep our households together?

In the time of Jesus the Middle Eastern household was large and extended. Everyone — parents, siblings, cousins — all lived together in the same compound. To leave the family or marry outside it was unthinkable. Belonging to the family group provided protection, housing, food and value systems by which to live. 

The first century followers of Jesus, therefore, could not believe what they heard Jesus say as quoted in today’s gospel — that to be his disciple one must not love mother, father, siblings, children more than him. 

Today, in our society households are defined in a variety of ways.  Few families live together in the same neighborhood much less the same house like they did during times of assimilation or the Depression.

Of course, this is not true for everyone. While they learn to speak a new language and find work, refugees and immigrants in our Capital District huddle together with family members and friends in worn out apartments not far from this very church building. Like our ancestors who migrated here these people sustain one another until they can get established on their own.

What does it mean to extend hospitality to strangers? The involvement of this parish in the Family Promise program brings to life the story in the first reading. A woman of influence tells her husband they should furnish a room for the prophet Elisha who was holy not because he preached orthodox doctrine but because he did the work of God. Grateful for what we have, we extend hospitality, new life and hope, to strangers because it is the responsible thing to do.

During this Independence Day weekend these readings help us think about the ideological American household and what is keeping us together. We examine the relationships between faith in God and faith in our nation. According to Massimo Faggioli Church teaching actually favors acceptance of the nation-state as the ideal means to develop a political dimension of human life that promotes the common good. 

This assertion creates a conundrum for Catholics in the United States. Not all of us agree on every cultural issue. How do we look out for one another at the same time we respect our differences? When do we oppose the passage of laws that deny human beings the right to live decent lives without fear? What words do we use to voice our abhorrence when elected officials use morally reprehensible rhetoric?

The Second Vatican Council taught us that God works through culture. When dominant trends in a society contradict faith in God and Christian values, faith communities tackle the causes of those trends. Confronting such inclinations by employing Christian perspectives on community life becomes a task especially for the local parish family.  [1]

Perhaps this is what Jesus was talking about in today’s gospel. Adhering to and acting upon the values he taught will require serious consideration on our part. He was not really commanding his followers to leave their families as much as he asked them to extend the hospitality, the values, the security they experienced in their Mediterranean households.

On local level it may mean being involved in our parish social justice programs — the food pantry, the sister parish in Darien, prison ministry and Family Promise to name a few. On another level it may mean listening to others intently, understanding different viewpoints on issues, seeking ways to keep the family together.


  1. Curran, Larry. Overview of the Notre Dame Study of Catholic Parish Life, Report #10, 1989. An old study but still valuable.