Richard S. Vosko

Musings on religion, art and architecture

Homily – 14 May 2017 – Things of Heaven & Earth

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Fifth Sunday of Easter A  – May 14, 2017 – Things of Heaven and Earth

Click here for today’s biblical texts

Fatima 051317

Thousands of pilgrims at Fátima this weekend!

This weekend Pope Francis is visiting Fátima, Portugal’s most renowned pilgrimage site. The pope will canonize Jacinta and Francisco Marto, two of the children who saw visions of Mary, the Mother of Jesus, 100 years ago.

Apparitions of Mary like the one at Fátima and others in Mexico, Ireland, France and Belgium, challenge the limitations of human thought. Consider what Hamlet said to Horatio after seeing a ghost: “there are more things in heaven and earth, Horatio, than are dreamt of in your (our) philosophy.” Hamlet (1.5.167-8)

Each Easter season our scriptures give us some idea of what may have happened to the followers of Christ after his post-resurrection appearances. They are stories of fear, disagreements, excitement, hope, skepticism and belief.

What is most curious is that, although Mary the Mother of Jesus is so highly regarded today as a model for facing problems of adversity and healing and even political strife, the bible does not tell us much about her presence or her contributions to these emerging communities after the resurrection of Christ.

What we do know about Mary is that she knew Jesus better than anyone else and after his death she had to confront loss, misunderstanding, isolation. You would think that early church leaders eagerly would have turned to her for her wisdom about what she had learned as the mother of Jesus and what he would do and say in various circumstances.

Spreading the gospel in the first century was not easy. Tensions existed because missionaries like Peter, Paul, Barnabas and others were evangelizing in places where there were diverse cultures. Just as in any community today the questions had to do with leadership, community power, political resistance, jealousy, fear and handling emergencies. Today’s first reading tells us the community was concerned about who would tend to hungry persons and those with few resources especially some widows?

To address this concern for people who were hungry the author of Luke-Acts wrote that seven reputable men were chosen to serve, a choice that was not arbitrary but acceptable to that community. Guerric DeBona, an expert in biblical and cultural studies, wrote that “consensus occurs when the community is gathered for consultation,” and that the “good order of the community allows for the word of God to move among the people.” [1]

Similar realities and diversities are present in our church today. As memberships in mainline religions continue to dwindle in some regions, the question for you and me is: how do we experience and sustain a modern day faith community? Our house has cracks in it that need attention otherwise the structure will collapse. 

Fixing the fissures, keeping the family together, requires teamwork, sharing the blame, telling the truth, seeking consensus and listening to different voices. Sometimes we will discover that clinging to the status quo is no longer sufficient and that new spiritual awakenings are important.

The second reading from Peter offers a blueprint for renewal and restoration. We are the living stones, the ministers chosen by God to be built into a spiritual house where we and others can find purpose, refuge and strength. [This is the kind of home where our children who share in holy communion with us for the first time today will find new life and nourishment.]

Jesus also used architecture to make a point. In his farewell address to his friends in that “Upper Room” he urged them not to be troubled. He said he was going home, to a very big house, and he would reserve a room for anyone willing to live justly and walk humbly. God’s house is so big there is room for everyone. No one is turned away.

Like a mother comforting her children Jesus’ words were reassuring to his followers. Our Lady of Fatima offered similar consolation in 1917 when she promised that prayer and good works would help end World War I. Her message still has merit today. At a candle light vigil Friday night in Fátima, the pope urged the pilgrims to “tear down all walls and cross every frontier … to make known God’s justice and peace.” This is something we can do together.


DeBona, Guerric. Between the Ambo and the Altar: Biblical Preaching and the Roman Missal Year A. (Collegeville: Liturgical Press) 2013, 130

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Author: Richard S. Vosko

Richard S. Vosko, Ph.D., Hon. AIA, is an internationally known sacred space planner. He is a presbyter in the Diocese of Albany who enjoys the classroom as much as the pulpit. On Sundays he presides at worship at St. Vincent de Paul Parish, Albany, NY. For more information on Vosko’s background, his projects, publications and speaking engagements please go to his website. For his homilies and occasional musings about religion, art and architecture go to his blog. Comments, questions and suggestions are always welcomed there.

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